Foreign Exchange Students at Cooper

Yara Elborolosy (CE ‘14) and Hindi Kornbluth (ChE ‘13)

Despite its small size, Cooper Union still manages to offer students a foreign exchange student program. This year, Cooper Union has five students from abroad studying here for either a semester or a year. Two are from Germany, two are from Spain, and one is from Iceland.

Cooper Union has also established connections with universities at these three countries that allow students from Cooper to study abroad during the summer. We were able to briefly interview three of the students: a junior civil engineer, a senior chemical engineer, and a senior mechanical engineer.

Alejandro Lanuza: Junior Civil Engineer. From Spain

The Cooper Pioneer: What school/year did you come from?

AL: The University of Burgos and I am in my third year. It is technically four years but you have to do a master’s degree because without it you can’t sign projects so most likely you won’t get hired. The master’s degree is a two year program.

TCP: Why Cooper?

AL: My university has a student exchange program. Every year there is a vacancy and students can apply. There are other universities affiliated with the exchange program but that involves having other students from the universities coming to my university as well. For example, if I was to study with one of those universities, they would send another kid to study at my university. It doesn’t have to be the same degree but the numbers have to match, more or less. With Cooper, it is just our university sending students over and Cooper decides on whether to accept each student.

TCP: What are the differences between studying in NYC and studying in Spain?

AL: Here the classes are more focused on practical applications while in Burgos it is more theoretical. The things you are taught here you will use in your future careers and work environments. In my city, there are 200,000 people and the university has about 11,000 students.

TCP: Is NYC what you expected it to be?

AL: I thought it was going to be cleaner than it turned out to be. The ideas I had of NYC came from the movies I’ve watched that were filmed in NYC. I love the atmosphere, the people, and the friendliness of the city.

Halldis Thoroddsen, Senior Chemical Engineer. From Iceland, here for the year.

TCP: How did you hear about Cooper?

HT: When I was looking for an exchange program from the University of Iceland I just went through the list of schools they had for chemical engineering and one of them happened to be Cooper.

TCP: Why did you pick Cooper?

HT: Mainly because of the location. You don’t get the opportunity to study in New York City often.

TCP: What are the biggest differences between Cooper and your home school?

HT: Midterms! Almost all of our finals are [worth] 100%. My school is also bigger, it’s like the biggest university in Iceland (they only have 4). But mainly the program is the same.

TCP: How are you enjoying New York?

HT: I really love it here!

Blanca Quiralte, Senior Mechanical Engineer. From Spain, here for the year.

TCP: What school/year did you come from?

BQ: I came from ICAI, an engineering school from Madrid, Spain.

TCP: Why Cooper?

BQ: When deciding which school I wanted to go to, I did some researched and I found that Cooper was a very good engineering school. It was a great opportunity for me and it would open many doors for me in the future. I also thought New York was a plus in my decision. So I guess the school’s reputation and its location made me choose it.

TCP: What was the biggest difference between NYC and home city? Biggest similarity?

BQ: The biggest difference I can see is the absolutely amazing culture cocktail NYC has. The biggest similarity is the dynamic of the city, how you can always find something to do.

TCP: What do you think of the experience so far?

BQ: I think it will be a unique experience, not only in an academic but also in a personal way. I want it to make me more of a professional and more skilled person.

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