Miles of Movies: Deepwater Horizon

by Miles Barber (CE ’18)

Deepwater Horizon is about the events surrounding the explosion on Deepwater, a Texas oil rig owned by British Petroleum. The film follows the events leading up to the explosion and how the crew tried their best to evacuate.

The first half of this film features Mike Williams (Mark Wahlberg), who explains how his rig works to his daughter for a school project. He uses a soda can to explain how the rig works by capping the pressure from the oil. A lot of this introduction with Mike’s family serves both as exposition and character development. Mixed in with Mike’s screen time, you get little errors happening on the rig, giving you a sense of foreboding and worry.

Though other characters are introduced when we reach the rig, Mike continues to be the main character in this film. While this half of the film is a little slower than the second half, it is still tense, as each of the little problems is so well introduced. Once Mike gets on the rig, he meets Jimmy Harrell (Kurt Russell), a no-nonsense supervisor who hates corporate interference which, in this film, is presented in the form of Vidrine (John Malkovich). Kurt Russell is such a force in this film and gives a really strong performance; he’s easy to get behind since he argues for safety when others don’t prioritize it. Something also worthy of praise is the sound design during the buildup, which lets you in on every creak in the rig, every little bubble of escaped pressure.

Then, the rig explodes. This half of the film is nonstop intensity, giving you no time to breathe. The camera shakes a little to make it feel real. The explosions are everywhere, as if there was nothing on the rig that couldn’t explode. The water is on fire. The makeup team makes each and every one of the characters look grimy and hurt. Everything feels like it could have happened as shown. The only thing that doesn’t quite work are the effects: some of the wide shots of the rig falling apart just don’t look realistic.

Overall, Deepwater Horizon is an effective disaster film. It’s well-acted, has good sound, and effectively presents the buildup and the aftermath of the explosion. Kurt Russell, in particular, is excellent. The effects weren’t quite as good as I might have hoped and I think the film could have been better explained at points (maybe it’s still unclear what happened) but I would recommend seeing this film if you’re a fan of disaster films. ◊

Grade: B-

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