Category Archives: News

2012 Election Summary

Matthew Lee (ME ‘15)

Tuesday, November 6th marked the re-election of Barack Obama as President of the United States. President Obama won the election with 332 electoral votes to Mitt Romney’s 206, a notable drop from then Senator Obama’s landslide victory over Senator McCain of 359 over 179. In addition, the 2012 popular vote was won by only about 3,000,000 votes, where the 2008 election carried Obama by more than 10,000,000 votes.

This year Obama won more votes from non-white voters, young voters, women, and those in big cities. Romney won more votes from college graduates and those with higher incomes.

Republicans lost 2 seats in the Senate, which were replaced by 1 Democratic and 1 Independent Senator. In the House of Representatives, Republicans lost 9 seats, Democrats gained 2, and the remaining 7 Representatives are of neither political party.

This election had some other notable results. This election marks the first time since 1820 that three consecutive incumbent presidents have been re-elected. Due to Hurricane Sandy, New Jersey voters were permitted to email their votes in, the first time in history this has ever occurred. Two astronauts voted from the International Space Station. The first Asian-American Woman and the first Buddhist Senator was elected in Hawaii, Rep. Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii). Mrs. Hirono was a member of the House of Representatives, and her successful election gave way to the election of the first Hindu Representative, Tulsi Gabbard.

For the first time, marijuana was legalized for recreational use in Colorado and Washington. Medical Marijuana is currently legal in 18 states. Same-sex marriage was legalized in Maryland, Maine, and Washington. These three states are the first to legalize same-sex marriage by popular vote, rather than by legislation or litigation. Minnesota became to first state to reject a state-wide constitutional ban against same-sex marriage. 38 states currently have same-sex marriage bans, 9 states and the District of Columbia have legalized same-sex marriage, and 3 have no laws for or against same-sex marriage.

Your Flu Shot Counts: Get One

Tensae Andargachew (ME ‘15)

On Monday, November 12, 2012, the Cooper Union offered students, faculty, and a staff a free flu vaccination, attempting to entice the community with a chance at winning an Amazon gift card and the opportunity to throw a pie at Dean Wolf’s face. Although the latter was only allowed should 60% of the Cooper population get vaccinated, which we failed to accomplish, an estimated 230 people (roughly 25% of the school) got the flu shot that day. An additional 70 people had also received a flu shot, either from Cooper’s October flu shot program, or from CVS, Walgreens, or their family doctor, meaning that for all intents and purposes approximately 30% of the school has received the 2012 vaccine.

What does this mean for the Cooper community? For starters, almost 1 in 3 people we meet in the halls, on the staircases or in the Foundation Building will have been vaccinated. So suppose there was an outbreak of the flu in the school. Dean Wolf provided a computer simulation, written by Shane Killian and modified by Robert Webb, whose work has been featured in PC Plus Magazine, written to mathematically model what might happen in the case of an outbreak. I ran a simulation with 30% of the population inoculated, to see a possible outcome:

At the end of this simulation, 99.63% of the people who were not vaccinated got the flu, while 50.58% of the people who were inocculated got the flu. Of course, this is a very general stochastic mathematical model, which may not be the most accurate model of what might happen to our instituition, should there be an outbreak. The model assumes a population of 800 while our population is closer to 1100. This model also seems to assume complete and total interaction of the population, which is not necessarily what happens to the extent the model presumes.

Moreover, the model also seems to assume that the people who are vaccinated are randomly dispersed throughout the population. However, the data suggests otherwise – 22% of the students of the School of Engineering received the vaccination, while 18% of the students from the School of Art and 20% from the School of Architecture did.
This model may well be a best case scenario for the school, which should be a very sobering fact. Had 80% been inoculated, we would have reached “herd inoculation” which would have protected almost all of us.

However, there is one thing that this simulation does tell us which is unfortunately even more dour – the flu virus is an incredibly contagious disease.

This year’s vaccination tackles three different strains of the virus – one influenza A H3N2 virus, one influenza A H1N1 virus (swine flu) and one influenza B virus.

All three are particularly nasty and someone getting one of these during the school year, introducing it into the school would not bode well for many of us. Many people don’t appreciate the difference between the common cold and the flu. Flu symptoms are often much worse, and can last for up to two weeks.

There is however at least one good thing that did come of this: those who were vaccinated have a reduced chance of getting the flu, as will the people they associated with, according to some studies. Also, if you are vaccinated, and still get the flu, your symptoms are likely to be less severe. Still, despite the extended hours for getting a flu shot and the relative ease of getting a shot – at best roughly 30% of the school is vaccinated. What might be attributed to the low turnout?

One possibility is that the hours did not work for all students. And while it is true that the School of Art, School of Engineering and School of Architecture have different hours, it seems unlikely that ten minutes could not be spared by more people. Dean Wolf believes that, in part, the low turnout was due to some misconceptions that students have about the vaccination itself.

As he went around the school on Monday night, advocating all get the flu shot, he had encountered some students who believed that because they ate healthy and exercised regularly, the flu shot was not necessary. Some believed myths about the flu shot – such as that it gave Alzheimer’s or autism. None of that is supported by medical science, for the record.

There is another possibility, and it is the case with so many other times in life – people figured that “everyone else will do what needs to be done (get a flu shot), so I don’t need to. But failing to get a flu shot because you believe others will is free riding on the sanitary responsibility of others.”

The numbers from this round of flu vaccinations at Cooper do not indicate that to be a safe bet at all. The safest, and wisest, thing to do is to get the shot because you will be protecting your health and the health of others.

Cooper’s Sandy Relief Efforts

Caroline Yu (EE ‘15)

Hurricane Sandy has been the talk of 2012 fall season. Sandy brought many inches of rain and, in some areas, snow, but was most destructive in coastal regions where there were storm surges 9-12 feet above normal. From stories of despair to inspiring stories of community building, Sandy has helped many people identify what things are most important in their lives.

To help the New York City residents who need the most aid, students, faculty, and staff at Cooper have gone above and beyond in efforts to restore communities. Below are some of the many ways Cooper’s various clubs and individuals took part in Sandy relief efforts.

The Society of Women Engineers, Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, and Hillel Cooper collected donations for New York City Urban Project’s Feed500 relief effort.

Students prepared and distributed necessities to affected areas, shelters, and relief organizations. Not only was this an inspirational gathering of volunteers, individuals connected with other individuals affected by the storm who had the same strong spirit and motivation to rebuild and recover quickly.

For an entire week, the Origami Club made everyone getting onto the elevators or going up the Grand Staircase stop in awe of origami creations. Suggested donations and auctioned off pieces raised a little less than $2000.

Zeta Psi organized a pie throwing contest to raise money. A food and clothes drive was also organized where all proceeds were donated to the Red Cross.

Intervarsity organized a sock drive to collect socks for those still in the dark or without shelter.

School wide events included a relief breakfast where Zeta Psi organized a pancake breakfast that lead everyone to Frankie’s and a benefit concert where the Coopertones, CooperNova, Sons of Pitches, President Bharucha and other Cooper musicians preformed.

Grand Staircase Handrail Update

Marcus Michelen (BSE ‘14)

Last year, I spoke with Vice President T.C. Westcott about whether or not there are plans to install a handrail on the Grand Staircase. She confirmed that a handrail was indeed in the works but was not sure when construction would take place. This month, I sat briefly sat down with her again to see where we currently are with these plans.

The Cooper Pioneer: Are we still going to install the handrail?

T.C. Wescott: We are still going install the handrail. The holdup at this point is that we are on the eve of getting the final certificate of occupancy for our new building, and filing new building permits prevents that from happening.

So the way new buildings work is that when you move in you get a temporary certificate of occupancy, which is standard. Actually some buildings that have for a very long time still have only a temporary certificate of occupancy and we don’t want to be in that group.

We’ve renewed our temporary certificate of occupancy as we’ve finish the remaining pieces. You need to close out all your permits, all your applications. Our tenants have to close out all of their applications to do work. Once that happens, the fire department comes in, the building department comes in, everyone comes in to do a final check off. Then you get your final certificate of occupancy. If you have open permits, you can’t get your final certificate of occupancy.

We’re just on the eve of that, so I’m told. Now, the building departments, I’m also told, run on their own time schedule. So we’re waiting to get that final certificate of occupancy so we can begin the work. We have to file the permit. Installing the handrail is a big job, so we have to have a permit.

So that’s the holdup at this point. But we’re still putting it in; it’s just a question of when we finally get our certificate of occupancy. Then we’ll move forward with it.

TCP: Last time we met, you said that Thom Mayne was going to submit a design.

TCW: We actually did get a design from one of the architects at Morphosis and we are working with some engineers and other to make sure we understand how the handrail needs to be installed. It’s a pretty straightforward design. Nothing as creative as some of the handrails I saw in the Pioneer, but consistent with the style with the staircase at this point.

TCP: Approximately when would you say this is going to be installed?

TCW: I shudder to say when at this point. I’d like to be able to say within in the next few weeks, but it’s up to the department of buildings. Once they get through the various things that they’re doing, we’re doing one last thing with the fire department. I’d like to say very soon, but last time I said it was going to be ready to go, I was found to be incorrect. So as soon as we get the certificate of occupancy we will commence work on that. As long as there’s a reasonable break; we can’t have students all over the place when we do it, but we may decide that that may make the most sense.

Budget Cuts: The Computer Center

Caroline Yu (ME ‘15)

As you may have noticed, there has been a significant decrease in number of students working in the Computer Center this semester. In order to find out more information about how the computer center is dealing with Cooper’s financial situation, I spoke to Alexander Erb, Computer Center Student Manager:

The Cooper Pioneer: In general, how is the Computer Center dealing with budget cuts?

Alexander Erb: In a similar fashion to all other departments at school, the computer center received a large budget cut for 2012-2013 academic year. What people might not know is that the computer center’s budget funds many other student work departments around the school as well. We felt strongly that we did not want to cut hours of services in these departments or the hourly wages and raises students receive in all these departments.

This left us only one choice – to cut the amount of shifts for student workers per hour. Since the computer center has the most amount of shifts per hour and all the other departments were running off the minimum number of staff to operate already, the computer center decided to shoulder most of the burden and decrease the number of employees working every hour.

TCP: What has changed and what hasn’t?

AE: Well, some of the obvious changes you see are that we went from as many as 5 operators an hour to one operator for all weekday hours of operation. On weekends now there are no operators regularly working any shift. But one thing people might not have noticed is with these changes, we have had students and full-time staff members generously donate their time and money to maintain the computer center so that it could continue to operate smoothly and so that student morale could be maintained.

One thing you might’ve noticed is that the computer center has been decorated for Halloween. This was paid for by the full-time staff members and has been well received. Many students have volunteered their time to help class mates and full-time staff when they see the computer center is busy. Supervisors and senior student staff members do additional work for free to help keep operations low when they see a chance to improve operations. We are all doing our part and it is nice to see that everyone has kept a positive attitude.

TCP: How much has the Computer Center interacted with President Bharucha, the Board of Trustees, and other administrators?

AE: Just like other departments, our full-time staff and student staff interact with the president’s office and administrators around Cooper on a daily basis. This is for both I.T. help and administration issues. As is the case for most departments at Cooper, the full-time faculty has some, but limited interactions with the board of trustees.

TCP: What has your role been during this time of transition and planning for the future?

AE: This year my role is that of the Student Manager for the Computer Center. I have had to oversee and put into action most of these changes and continue to look for more ways that we can improve our efficiency – that is with respect to my performance as well. I have been fortunate to work with a dedicated staff (students and full-time faculty) who have made all of these transitions go very smoothly.

Foreign Exchange Students at Cooper

Yara Elborolosy (CE ‘14) and Hindi Kornbluth (ChE ‘13)

Despite its small size, Cooper Union still manages to offer students a foreign exchange student program. This year, Cooper Union has five students from abroad studying here for either a semester or a year. Two are from Germany, two are from Spain, and one is from Iceland.

Cooper Union has also established connections with universities at these three countries that allow students from Cooper to study abroad during the summer. We were able to briefly interview three of the students: a junior civil engineer, a senior chemical engineer, and a senior mechanical engineer.

Alejandro Lanuza: Junior Civil Engineer. From Spain

The Cooper Pioneer: What school/year did you come from?

AL: The University of Burgos and I am in my third year. It is technically four years but you have to do a master’s degree because without it you can’t sign projects so most likely you won’t get hired. The master’s degree is a two year program.

TCP: Why Cooper?

AL: My university has a student exchange program. Every year there is a vacancy and students can apply. There are other universities affiliated with the exchange program but that involves having other students from the universities coming to my university as well. For example, if I was to study with one of those universities, they would send another kid to study at my university. It doesn’t have to be the same degree but the numbers have to match, more or less. With Cooper, it is just our university sending students over and Cooper decides on whether to accept each student.

TCP: What are the differences between studying in NYC and studying in Spain?

AL: Here the classes are more focused on practical applications while in Burgos it is more theoretical. The things you are taught here you will use in your future careers and work environments. In my city, there are 200,000 people and the university has about 11,000 students.

TCP: Is NYC what you expected it to be?

AL: I thought it was going to be cleaner than it turned out to be. The ideas I had of NYC came from the movies I’ve watched that were filmed in NYC. I love the atmosphere, the people, and the friendliness of the city.

Halldis Thoroddsen, Senior Chemical Engineer. From Iceland, here for the year.

TCP: How did you hear about Cooper?

HT: When I was looking for an exchange program from the University of Iceland I just went through the list of schools they had for chemical engineering and one of them happened to be Cooper.

TCP: Why did you pick Cooper?

HT: Mainly because of the location. You don’t get the opportunity to study in New York City often.

TCP: What are the biggest differences between Cooper and your home school?

HT: Midterms! Almost all of our finals are [worth] 100%. My school is also bigger, it’s like the biggest university in Iceland (they only have 4). But mainly the program is the same.

TCP: How are you enjoying New York?

HT: I really love it here!

Blanca Quiralte, Senior Mechanical Engineer. From Spain, here for the year.

TCP: What school/year did you come from?

BQ: I came from ICAI, an engineering school from Madrid, Spain.

TCP: Why Cooper?

BQ: When deciding which school I wanted to go to, I did some researched and I found that Cooper was a very good engineering school. It was a great opportunity for me and it would open many doors for me in the future. I also thought New York was a plus in my decision. So I guess the school’s reputation and its location made me choose it.

TCP: What was the biggest difference between NYC and home city? Biggest similarity?

BQ: The biggest difference I can see is the absolutely amazing culture cocktail NYC has. The biggest similarity is the dynamic of the city, how you can always find something to do.

TCP: What do you think of the experience so far?

BQ: I think it will be a unique experience, not only in an academic but also in a personal way. I want it to make me more of a professional and more skilled person.

Financial Update: Jamshed Bharucha

Marcus Michelen (BSE ‘14) and Saimon Sharif (CHE ‘15)

There are many rumors circulating that concern the future of Cooper. With anxiety surrounding the upcoming meetings of the Board of Trustees growing at uncontrollable rates, we reached out to President Bharucha to give us a more clear picture of Cooper’s future.

The Cooper Pioneer: The last Board of Trustees meeting was on September 19th. Could you summarize the outcome of this meeting?

Jamshed Bharucha: The outcome was to set the stage for the next meeting (the December meeting) by setting out the timeline I had communicated to the deans and the faculty of the three schools. November 15th would be the date by which the faculties of the three schools would agree on a plan to go forward. I would integrate those plans and take them to the board meeting in December. That was basically the outcome of the meeting – a timeline.

The board would then digest the plans. including my own recommendations, and they might take some time to do that. So there won’t be an announcement in December, but in the New Year at some point we would announce any decisions that might have been made. At the board meeting, we talked about the three criteria that should be considered in the strategic planning that the faculty are engaged in.

The first is maintaining academic excellence. Cooper Union has the finest student body, bar none, in my opinion, and that is our great asset. Together with the excellence of the education and the excellence of the faculty, Cooper has an unparalleled learning community.

The second point is vision. The plans should be not just to solve a financial crisis, but an opportunity to position our schools and programs for the future. The future of the city, the future of the country, the future of the world.

The third is that the plans must be financially sustainable. All three go together and I’m happy to elaborate on any of those. So the board discussed all of those pieces, what might a vision be like, what constitutes sustainability, and why.

TCP: Is the financial sustainability criterion specifically just quantitative or is it also based on reliability?

JB: Sustainability has to include an assessment of the risks of that plan. Any plan has risks. And any plan has pros and cons. A lot of people come in every day telling me what the cons are and what the problems are about any given option, but a lot of people also come in with solutions and plans that are not only viable but very exciting. I think we need to focus on those.

TCP: In the event that the Board of Trustees decides to close one of the three schools, what would happen to current and incoming students?

JB: I said when I spoke in Rose Auditorium a year ago in October, quite forcefully, “I’m not here to close a school.” I’m a teacher, I’m an educator. I’m here to ensure that Cooper Union thrives. Thriving, to me, means that we continue to operate and we do so in a vibrant way.

Obviously, we’re in a tricky situation. We have to be mindful of all possibilities, but we have already stated in April that the class coming in the fall of 2013 would be admitted without any alteration of our policies and that would see that class through. Should any of our current policies change, they would only affect classes beyond that, except for the master’s degree in architecture. That degree, which is well established and attracts top students from around the world, would have a change in policy, starting in the fall.

TCP: I understand that it’s your role to make sure the schools do not close, but it is my understanding that in December, it is the purpose of these financial plans to decide whether the three schools are going to stay open. Is this correct?

JB: It’s more complex than that. It’s more subtle than that. The goal is to stay open, to survive and to thrive. In order to do that, the plan has to be sustainable. It’s almost axiomatic that if the plan is not sustainable, it cannot be sustained. I’ve said and I believe very deeply as a faculty member that the faculty is at the core of our educational enterprise. I don’t think any faculty member would disagree with that. I cannot impose a plan, nor can the board, and I have made it clear to the board that neither of us could impose a plan over the objection over the faculty ; it won’t work because the faculty are teaching the students. The faculty have to believe and support not only the educational programs that they provide, but also the philosophical basis of those programs.

So the purpose of the faculty focus this fall is for the faculty to find where they can agree on a model that has these components. Faculty agreement on a sustainable model has to be a foundational assumption, it seems to me, in order to be sustainable because you can’t have a successful institution if it is operating in a state of dissent.

Lincoln said: “A house divided cannot stand.” It’s the same thing at Cooper Union. Obviously there’s going to be disagreement, and not everybody is going to support every piece of every plan, but I think the faculty of each school must (and they are doing so with admirable commitment) come together to support a plan that is appropriate for that school. It’s also not a one-size-fits-all. Engineering is quite different from Art, even though we are a union.

I want to work very hard to find ways for greater collaboration between the schools, to bring the advancement of science together with the advancement of art. But the fact of the matter is that you are enrolled in a particular school and there’s a curriculum Even as we try to bring the schools together, it’s really the faculty of each school that understands best what’s appropriate for that school. Faculty support for a viable, strong solution that is academically excellent, visionary and financially sustainable is the goal here and is a prerequisite for what we do.

TCP: If one of the schools fails to meet one of the three criteria, however, what would then happen?

JB: It’s my job to make sure that it doesn’t happen. I’m not just waiting until November 15th. I’m working with the deans and the faculty. We’ve provided them with the resources in terms of expertise and consultants to cost out various plans and to look at the benefits and the risks. I’d say that this point, all three schools have bought into the process. We are committed to making something that works.

So there’s no point talking about the “what-ifs”. We can talk about all kinds of “what-ifs” but I think we’re here to make it succeed. I would say, as of today, we’re already at a point where the faculty are engaged in constructive dialog. Obviously if a school comes up with a plan we think is not viable, then I think the first thing we do is go back to the school and say, “this is a problem. Let’s try and fix it together.”

As long as there’s that will to engage in vigorous civil discourse and overcome differences, we’ll find solutions. Will they be easy? No. If you’ve seen some of the financials, you’ll see why. We can’t be sanguine. There might still be pockets of our constituencies who feel that there are solutions that don’t involve difficult decisions, or who feel that the financial problems are caused by this or by that, by the building or by an administrative bloat or so on and so forth.

I think you’ll see if you actually go through the numbers, that there is a long standing disconnect in the budget that goes back at least forty years that was greatly exacerbated in the early 1990s because of the falloff of the rent streams from the Chrysler building. That has been overcome through the years because of super-charged stock market returns, because of selling assets, because of borrowing, and now we’re at a point where there are no stock-market returns and we don’t have that many assets left to sell.

We’ve borrowed a lot of money and now it’s time to say, “Let’s make it sustainable.” The principle source that has funded the Cooper Union since the Chrysler building was built in the 1930s does not keep up with inflation, even with the lowest assumptions about inflation. Expenses are exponential, because of inflation. Higher education inflation is around 4% to 5% annually.

Even if we assume a 3% inflation, which would be the consumer price index for items other than healthcare, and then 7.5% a year for healthcare. Remember that benefits are roughly 9 million dollars out of our 60 million dollar budget. If the healthcare benefits are growing at 7.5%, you’ve got an exponential function where the expenses are compounding by a blended inflation rate that’s 7.5% per year for healthcare expenses and roughly 3% to 4% for other things. We can talk about shutting down this, or cutting that cost, and we’re looking at all the possible ways to cut cost.

But in the end, cutting costs brings down the y-intercept and shallows the exponential growth; but eventually the exponential function catches up. On how Cooper Union is funded, there are many funding sources, but the main one is the Chrysler building. There are two components to that: the rents and the tax equivalencies. The rents are on a step function with a flat portion of the step that goes for ten years. Now the next step up is 2018-19, when we get a big boost in rent. But there’s a mistaken belief out there that that solves the problem.

The reason it’s mistaken is that after that it’s flat again, the exponential cost function eventually overtakes that no matter what assumptions you make about spending cuts. The following step-up in 2029 is so small as to not be able to mitigate inflation, and you’ve got a situation of mounting deficits as far as the eyes can see. Actually this problem was known as early as 1969. It’s just that the institution took a number of steps: they closed Green Camp, they closed the physics programs, they sold the Bowery Bar, got rid of the Cooper Hewitt museum.

Those were all well-intentioned decisions to try to preserve the full-scholarship for all enrolled students. But as I see it now, we are at a point where we have to come up with a sustainable model. We have the time to do it while preserving academic excellence and being visionary. But if we wait too long, it becomes harder and harder to do something that’s visionary.

TCP: I don’t want to go too far into the “what-if”, but is it true that regardless of what happens with the Board of Trustees decision later this year or early in 2013, that all current students would be able to finish their education at the Cooper Union?

JB: Yes. All current students would be able to get degrees from Cooper Union, assuming they meet the requirements.

TCP: Last year, it was announced that the engineering grad school would start charging tuition. Where are with that plan now, exactly?

JB: Actually, that wasn’t quite accurate. The announcement was that we are going to lead with the hybrid model which was, and still is, the idea that the more revenues you can get from programs other than the undergraduate programs, the smaller the problem becomes. If you ever do have to go from 100% tuition scholarships to something less than that, the burden is greatly lessened by these other programs. The architecture graduate program will start contributing to their revenue target. If the engineering faculty decide that that’s not the place to go, that there are maybe other ways, then that’s an option. We have not actually decided that engineering master’s program will start charging tuition. It may happen. It may not happen. There may be new programs. There may be changes in our current policy. All of that is part of the planning process under way.

TCP: Do you have any closing comments that you would like to say?

JB: I do. I think that it’s really important to remember that in spite of all this, Cooper Union has a brilliant future. I assure all of our current students and former students that your degrees will be ever more respected and worthy as time goes on. We will overcome these challenges, not without controversy, not without difficult decisions. Anybody that tells you there is a straightforward path forward, I believe, does not understand the problem. It is complex and only can be understood if you’re prepared to understand the complexity. But we will overcome it.

The community is coming together as we’ve gotten more information out, through FAQs and other means. [Vice president] T.C. [Westcott] has met with people and continues to, and I meet with people every day to facilitate communication. Cooper has a brilliant future.

New York City is going through a renaissance. It’s the most exciting time in New York City’s history in easily half a century. I go to lots of meeting at the mayor’s office and with business leaders and educational leaders in New York. As you know, the mayor has launched this technology initiative to make New York a leading technology innovation city. New York is already a design center.

We at Cooper have, in some sense, many of the ingredients: we have a school of engineering, a school of art, a school of architecture and a faculty of humanities and social sciences.

If we can bring those together in exciting ways, which we will, we can position ourselves within this new New York renaissance, particularly since we’re in such a hot neighborhood as well as being one of the most exciting institutions contributing to the city, the country and the world.

I see this as opportunity – not without a lot of hard work and not without some bumps in the road. I can assure you that whatever plans we announce in January, they’re going to need modification because whenever you’re doing new things, you learn as you go along. We will come out at the end an even stronger institution. We will attract the very best students. We will provide an exciting education.

Looking back people will say that this was opportunity seized in the wake of a crisis. I hope that people will join me in doing that. I do think that in terms of the discussion in the community, understandably, there was anger and indignation because it was quite a bit of surprise that Cooper Union had these challenges.

But I think that as we go forward, the tone has become a lot more positive and constructive as people approach it from the point of view of “how can I learn the facts” and “how can we brainstorm solutions” and “how can we come together”.

Even though we might have differences, in a civic debate, however vigorous, if we can have those conversations as we are having now, in a constructive and respectful way, we should be able to demonstrate to the world that the country should be able to solve its problems. We are an educational institution. We can set an example for how people can come together, and perhaps our politicians can follow our example.

Peter Cooper wanted students to learn how to engage in democratic civic discourse, which means disagreeing vehemently but respectfully, based on fact and reason. People ask me, given all the protests, what motivates me, I have one word answer: it’s the students. Every time I get to meet with the students, whether it’s on Cape Cod with the athletes, whether it’s with the origami club or the class that I teach, or meetings that I have with students, I’m reminded of that. That’s why we’re here, is for the students. That’s why we will succeed.