Miles of Movies: Your Name

By Miles Barber (CE ‘18)

Every once in a while, a movie comes along with rave reviews and high expectations, but it’s a few months before it makes it to my area. (This film was released in Japan in 2016 but not until quite recently in the U.S.) All of the things I heard, the amazing animation and the great story, really built up the anticipation. And then, in a rare twist, this film exceeds my expectations. Your Name is the best anime film I’ve ever seen, and I think it’s one of the best traditionally-animated films ever made.

The premise is fairly easy to understand: Two people, a country girl and a city boy, randomly wake up inside each other’s bodies for a day at a time. Some days they’re swapped and some days they aren’t. They slowly learn more about each other and accidentally mess up days of each other’s’ lives to great comedic effect. Each lead very different lives with different dreams and aspirations, which really blends well to make this story engaging. Due to some twists and turns in the story, they become determined to find each other. And all of this happens around a gorgeous comet event. It might seem a little cheesy, but it works for the movie. It certainly worked for me.

This film is perfectly paced. It draws you in from its first scene and never lets go. I was thoroughly invested in the characters and incredible premise right from the start. And just when it seems like a chapter in the story is going to overextend itself, there is some twist that blows your mind while simultaneously fitting perfectly into the movie. The film wraps itself up in a nice bow that leaves you satisfied with what you’ve seen and eager to experience the film again. You really feel like a lot of time has passed in this story, and parts of it actually create a profound sense of nostalgia.

The technical aspects of the film were, as expected, fantastic. The animation leaps off the screen, especially in the rural landscapes where the girl lives. There are so many gorgeous shots of the landscape that feel incredibly real. The animation also handles lighting very well. There is a scene at twilight that feels incredible, and the comet is illuminated beautifully in the sky as it passes overhead. There is just something incredibly magical about the way this film is animated. While there are plenty of computerized effects, they somehow blend with the traditional, hand-drawn animation really well and don’t feel jarring.

Something else that I found impressive about this film is how well it manages to flesh out its characters and put them in realistic relationships. Not once did a character’s actions feel contrived or strange; instead, they just make sense. The differences in the lives of these characters are so well-realized in this movie. Even though this type of story is on the complicated side, I never felt confused or lost at any point in the story; it was all clear and powerfully directed.

There is something in this movie for everyone. Whether it’s from the touching story, the great twists, the genuine mystery element that takes form when the two characters try to find each other, the gorgeous animation, or the premise alone, Your Name will leave it’s mark and you’ll never want it to end. ◊

Grade: A+

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Be Heard: Student Trustee Voting Opens Soon

By Brandon Quinere (CE ‘19)

Get those voting fingers ready, another election season is upon us! Student Trustee voting begins Wednesday, April 5, and it all kicks off tomorrow, April 4, at the Student Trustee Forum hosted by The Pioneer. Together, our two candidates, Mary Dwyer (ME ‘19) and Irisa Llana (Arch ‘21), will participate in the forum in the hopes of winning the student vote and becoming selected by the Board as our new trustee.

Irisa Llana (Arch '21)
Irisa Llana (Arch ’21)
Mary Dwyer (ME '19)
Mary Dwyer (ME ’19)

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Mission Statement Rewrite

By Juan José García (Art ‘20)

Yet, maybe it is precisely that impetus to move forward that might get in the way of the intent of the draft.

On Tuesday March 7, 2017, a campus notice was sent to the Cooper community containing the current draft of the mission statement of Cooper Union. The draft was sent with hopes that it “will generate the kind of discussion and debate that will add to the renewed sense of institutional purpose at this time,” while also aiming to receive input from the community.

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The House of the Suicide

By Sam Jiang (ME ‘19)

Ominous black spikes point skywards in Cooper Square Park–it’s impossible to miss the new additions to the Cooper skyline: The House of the Suicide and the House of the Mother of the Suicide, also known as the Jan Palach Memorial. Based on the designs of John Hejduk, a Czech-American architect who served as Cooper Union’s founding Dean of Architecture from 1975 to 2000, the two installations blend sculpture and architecture, with the black structure–the Mother–containing a tiny room with a tiny window that forever watches over her Son.

Photos by Zheng Alex Liu
Photos by Zheng Alex Liu

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The New and Improved Code of Conduct

By Gabriela Godlewski (CE ‘19)

A Joint Student Council committee is currently rewriting The Cooper Union Code of Conduct to keep the administration and student body up to date with the ethics and conduct expected of Cooper students. The committee members—Octavia Parker (Arch ‘20), Marianna Tymocz (ChE ‘18), Clara Zinky (Art ‘17), and Anton Luz (CE ‘18)—have been meeting weekly with Dean Christopher Chamberlin to ensure that the new code will be written to express the best interest of students and faculty. They are in the process of presenting the current, and hopefully final, draft to the JSC for ratification.

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ReCooperate

ReCooperate was a weekend-long interdisciplinary event hosted by
Professor Eric Lima, Ruchi Patel (ChE ‘18), and Irisa Llana (Arch ‘21). There were structured activities hosted by student groups as well as free time to socialize with students and faculty. Above, the Cooper Dramatic Society hosts an improv session Saturday, March 25. Below, Ben Park (CE ‘18) of the Culinary Club shows off his cooking skills earlier that day.  Photos by Irisa Llana (Arch ‘21).

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